3rd Super Bowl Blackout Threat in a Row

Nexstar Media Group Threatens 12-city Blackout Unless TDS Agrees to Nexstar’s Demands

Washington, D.C. – Nexstar Media Group, one of the largest broadcasters in the country, is continuing its blackout of small cable provider TDS just days before the Super Bowl, impacting customers in Nevada, New Mexico, Texas, and Oregon.  Nexstar’s blackout of TDS began 31 days ago.

In one of the more remarkable demands, Nexstar would force TDS to carry unspecified programming as a replacement should its stations lose their network affiliation agreements.  For example, Nexstar could swap out The Big 4 Networks (ABC, CBS, FOX, NBC) that include marquee events like live sports, award shows, and other popular television programs, with anything from oldie television reruns to a home shopping network.  TDS would be forced to pay a premium price for less desirable programming.

Using the Super Bowl as leverage to increase fees on consumers for what is supposed to be a free, over the air television is an annual event.  In 2018, Northwest Broadcasting threatened to blackout Charter Communications customers in Yuma, AZ, Eureka, CA, and Idaho Falls, ID.  In 2017, Independent Broadcasting pulled down its signal, preventing Mediacom customers in Sioux Falls, SD from watching Super Bowl LI between the New England Patriots and Atlanta Falcons.  ATVA has asked the FCC to ban broadcasters’ use of marquee programming as leverage during retrans negotiations.

“Another Super Bowl, another blackout, and higher TV bills for thousands of Americans.  When will it end?  The answer is it won’t until Washington steps up on behalf of consumers and modernizes America’s ancient television laws,” said Trent Duffy, ATVA spokesman.

Nexstar is holding the following stations hostage for higher fees:

Broadcaster
Provider
City
State
Station
Nexstar
TDS
Ruidoso
NM
KRQE-CBS
Nexstar
TDS
Truth or Consequences
NM
KRQE-CBS
Nexstar
TDS
Socorro
NM
KRQE-CBS
Nexstar
TDS
Alamogordo
NM
KRQE-CBS
Nexstar
TDS
Carlsbad
NM
KRQE-CBS
Nexstar
TDS
Hobbs
NM
KRQE-CBS
Nexstar
TDS
Lovington
NM
KRQE-CBS
Nexstar
TDS
Mesquite
NV
KLAS-CBS
Nexstar
TDS
Madras
OR
KBNZ-CBS
Nexstar
TDS
Crooked River Ranch
OR
KBNZ-CBS
Nexstar
TDS
Prineville
OR
KBNZ-CBS
Nexstar
TDS
Seminole
TX
KLBK-CBS

Consumers were threatened with up to 70 year-end blackouts.  Broadcasters followed through with their blackouts in 24 states and the District of Columbia, impacting a total of 54 markets. Live televised football games are the most frequently targeted and blacked out programming category, according to an analysis by ATVA.

Broadcasters shattered the record for the most TV blackouts in a single calendar year in 2017, intentionally taking down signals from cable and satellite customers a staggering 213 times.  Consumers were blacked out 165 times in 2018 while broadcasters collected $10.1 billion in retrans fees, up from $9.3 billion in 2017.

The 1992 Cable Act established the doctrines of government mandated broadcast carriage or must carry, and forced negotiations known as retransmission consent.  Retransmission consent fees are the payments that TV distributors (cable, satellite, and other TV providers) are required to pay in order to carry broadcast TV channels.  If demands for higher fees are not met, broadcasters pull their signals.   A cable or satellite operator is not allowed to provide subscribers a broadcaster’s signal without permission, which allows broadcasters to use the threat of, or actual, blackouts to extort higher fees that are ultimately paid by subscribers.

Major rules governing the U.S.  media marketplace were first written in 1934 and last updated for the media in the 1992 Cable Act. These rules were written at a time when the Internet was still in its infancy and multiple streaming options didn’t exist.

TV Blackout Crisis: 2017 Breaks Blackout Record as Broadcasters Rake in Billions from Viewers

Since 2010, millions of Americans have seen dark screens instead of watching their favorite channels due to more than 1,000 broadcaster-initiated blackouts. In the 10-year period between 2008 and 2018, retrans fees collected by broadcasters went from about a half a billion dollars to $10.1 billion, an increase of 1,920 percent.  With 213 blackouts, 2017 was the worst year for TV blackouts on record.

  • 30 blackouts in 2019
  • 165 blackouts in 2018
  • 213 blackouts in 2017
  • 104 blackouts in 2016
  • 193 blackouts in 2015
  • 94 blackouts in 2014
  • 119 blackouts in 2013
  • 90 blackouts in 2012
  • 42 blackouts in 2011
  • 8 blackouts in 2010

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The American Television Alliance (ATVA) brings together an unprecedented coalition of consumer groups, cable, satellite, telephone companies, and independent programmers to raise awareness about the risk TV viewers face as broadcasters increasingly threaten service disruptions that would deny viewers access to the programs they and their families enjoy.

For more information about ATVA, visit our website. Follow us on Twitter @ATVAlliance.

Broadcasters Use Old Myths in Attempt to Keep Video Marketplace Laws Old and Unfair

In a recent Politico article broadcasters made the same tired and false claims in the debate about modernizing America’s video laws to protect consumers from TV blackouts and higher fees.  The last comprehensive reauthorization of U.S. video laws was in 1992, yes 1992.

This year, Congress must reauthorize the Satellite Television Extension and Localism Act Reauthorization (STELAR), or 870,000 satellite subscribers, many in the most rural areas of the country, will lose access to broadcast channels they receive from satellite.

As Congress considers this important legislation, broadcasters are spreading misinformation in their latest attempt to protect the broken retransmission consent process, which one Member of Congress calls a “racket.” The racket is that broadcasters use marquee programming like live sports and award shows to extract higher fees or risk a TV blackout.  Blackouts and consumer retrans fees have soared in recent years, as broadcasters seek to replace lost advertising profits.

The American Television Alliance (ATVA) supports the reauthorization of STELAR so rural America can continue receiving all their broadcast channels, but also believes it is way past time to modernize retransmission consent rules which currently favor broadcasters at the expense of consumers and competition.  As this debate begins, policymakers deserve to know the truth about the myths they’ll hear from broadcasters:     

Broadcaster Myth: TV viewers will not be negatively impacted if Congress fails to reauthorize STELAR.

Fact: If Congress fails to re-authorize STELAR, at least 870,000 consumers, mostly in rural areas, would lose broadcast channels from satellite.

Broadcaster Myth: Retrans fees are not a problem because they are less than those charged for some cable channels.

Fact: Retrans fees charged by broadcasters are for channels that are supposed to be provided FREE in exchange for the U.S. government (and taxpayers) providing FREE high-value spectrum to broadcasters for the distribution of local news and other public-interest programming.  Moreover, unlike cable channels, pay TV providers MUST CARRY local broadcast stations under the ancient provisions of the 1992 Cable Act.  Finally, retrans fees are the fastest rising part of consumers’ cable bills, skyrocketing from about $500 million in 2008 to $10.1 billion in 2018, or 1,920%.  These skyrocketing retrans fees are directly responsible for fueling the blackout crisis and are ultimately passed on to consumers.

Broadcaster Myth: Even if STELAR were to be reauthorized, it should be a clean reauthorization with no additional policy updates that could modernize the television marketplace.

Fact: Dozens of policy changes have been included in previous reauthorizations to help consumers.  This should be no different.

Broadcaster Myth:  The retransmission consent regime is working the way it’s supposed to because television blackouts are rare.

Fact: Wrong.  Since 2010, millions of Americans have seen dark screens instead of watching their favorite channels due to more than 1,000 broadcaster-initiated blackouts.  The number of blackouts went from only 8 in 2010 to a record setting 213 in 2017.  Furthermore, the threat of a blackout can be enough to extort higher fees that are ultimately paid by subscribers.

Additionally, retrans fees were supposed to fund things like local news and local programming. In reality, what local stations claim is local often isn’t local at all, because they are owned by large publicly traded corporations that control dozens of stations across the country. Rather than airing local news, big broadcasters are increasingly relying on syndication services to broadcast the same exact thing in hundreds of local TV markets.

Broadcasters Blackout Playoffs and Golden Globes

Small Cable Provider TDS Calls Out Broadcaster Nexstar for Egregious Negotiation Tactics in Letter to FCC

 Washington, D.C.  TV viewers looking for playoff football and the Golden Globes this weekend found blank screens as broadcasters continued their New Year’s blackouts. Small cable operator TDS sent a letterover the weekend to Federal Communications Commission (FCC) Chairman Ajit Pai regarding the egregious negotiation tactics used by one of the country’s largest broadcasters, Nexstar Media Group.

Blackouts across the country continued over the weekend:

  • TV station owner Nexstar blacked out American Cable Association (ACA) member TDS on December 31, 2018 inIndiana, Tennessee, Colorado, Nevada, New Mexico, Texas, Oregon, and Utah. Nexstar is demanding a rate increase up to 129%.  Nexstar also blacked out small cable provider Acentek in Grand Rapids, MI and Lacrosse,   Nexstar’s blackouts impacted both the Golden Globes and pro football playoff games.
  • Tribune Broadcastingblacked out six million Charter Communications’ Spectrum customers on January 2, 2019 in 24 markets across the country.  Tribune also pulled its WGN America cable signal, which impacts 14 million consumers.  The blackout impacted pro football playoff games over the weekend.
  • TV viewers in the U.S. Virgin Islands lost their ABC and CBS signals on Viya – the territory’s only cable TV service – on January 5, 2019. According to recent reports, Lilly Broadcasting more than doubled its fees for the channels in its package.

“The New Year is always a favorite blackout target for broadcasters but this is by far the worst it’s ever been,” said Trent Duffy, American Television Alliance (ATVA) spokesman.  “The bad news is that 2019 won’t be any better unless Congress and the FCC act to protect consumers and modernize the outdated video laws that were designed for a marketplace that hasn’t existed for a decade.”

Consumers were threatened with up to 70 year-end blackouts.  Broadcasters followed through with their blackouts in 24 states and the District of Columbia, impacting a total of 54 markets. Live televised football games are the most frequently targeted and blacked out programming category, according to an analysis by ATVA.

Broadcasters shattered the record for the most TV blackouts in a single calendar year in 2017, intentionally taking down signals from cable and satellite customers a staggering 213 times.  Consumers were blacked out 164 times in 2018 while broadcasters collected $10.1 billion in retrans fees, up from $9.3 billion in 2017.

The 1992 Cable Act established the doctrines of government mandated broadcast carriage or must carry, and forced negotiations known as retransmission consent.  Retransmission consent fees are the payments that TV distributors (cable, satellite, and other TV providers) are required to pay in order to carry broadcast TV channels.  If demands for higher fees are not met, broadcasters pull their signals.   A cable or satellite operator is not allowed to provide subscribers a broadcaster’s signal without permission, which allows broadcasters to use the threat of, or actual, blackouts to extort higher fees that are ultimately paid by subscribers.

Major rules governing the U.S.  media marketplace were first written in 1934 and last updated for the media in the 1992 Cable Act. These rules were written at a time when the Internet was still in its infancy and multiple streaming options didn’t exist.

TV Blackout Crisis: 2017 Breaks Blackout Record as Broadcasters Rake in Billions from Viewers

Since 2010, millions of Americans have seen dark screens instead of watching their favorite channels due to more than 1,000 broadcaster-initiated blackouts. In the 10-year period between 2008 and 2018, retrans fees collected by broadcasters went from about a half a billion dollars to $10.1 billion, an increase of 1,920 percent.  With 213 blackouts, 2017 was the worst year for TV blackouts on record.

  • 26 blackouts in 2019
  • 164 blackouts in 2018
  • 213 blackouts in 2017
  • 104 blackouts in 2016
  • 193 blackouts in 2015
  • 94 blackouts in 2014
  • 119 blackouts in 2013
  • 90 blackouts in 2012
  • 42 blackouts in 2011
  • 8 blackouts in 2010

The American Television Alliance (ATVA) brings together an unprecedented coalition of consumer groups, cable, satellite, telephone companies, and independent programmers to raise awareness about the risk TV viewers face as broadcasters increasingly threaten service disruptions that would deny viewers access to the programs they and their families enjoy.

For more information about ATVA, visit our website. Follow us on Twitter @ATVAlliance.

Broadcasters Blackout Millions of TV Viewers Across 24 States and 54 Markets

Broadcasters Blackout Millions of TV Viewers Across 24 States and 54 Markets
College Football Bowl Games, Pro Football Playoffs Threatened
All-Time Blackouts Top 1,000 With No End in Sight
Broadcasters Pocket $10.1 Billion for ‘Free’ TV in 2018

Washington, D.C.  Broadcasters across the country blacked out millions of consumers on the eve of College football bowl games, pro football playoff games, and holiday programming, bringing the total blackout count for 2018 to 164. According to an American Television Alliance analysis (ATVA) of publicly available reports, consumers were threatened with up to 70 year-end blackouts.  Broadcasters followed through with their blackout in 24 states and the District of Columbia, impacting a total of 54 markets.  Live televised football games are the most frequently targeted and blacked out programming category, according to an analysis by ATVA.

Blackouts across the country included:

Broadcasters shattered the record for the most TV blackouts in a single calendar year in 2017, intentionally taking down signals from cable and satellite customers a staggering 213 times last year.  Consumers have been blacked out 164 times in 2018 while broadcasters collected $10.1 billion in retrans fees, up from $9.3 billion in 2017.

“The New Year is always a favorite blackout target for broadcasters but this is by far the worst it’s ever been,” said Trent Duffy, ATVA spokesman.  “The bad news is that 2019 won’t be any better unless Congress and the FCC act to protect consumers and modernize the outdated video laws that were designed for a marketplace that hasn’t existed for a decade,” said ATVA spokesman Trent Duffy.

The 1992 Cable Act established the doctrines of government mandated broadcast carriage or must carry; and forced negotiations known as retransmission consent.  Retransmission consent fees are the payments that TV distributors (cable, satellite, and other TV providers) are required to pay in order to carry broadcast TV channels.  If demands for higher fees are not met, broadcasters pull their signals.   A cable or satellite operator is not allowed to provide subscribers a broadcaster’s signal without permission, which allows broadcasters to use the threat of or actual blackouts to extort higher fees that are ultimately paid by subscribers.

The rules governing our video marketplace were first written in 1934 and last updated in the 1992 Cable Act. These rules were written at a time when the internet was still in its infancy and multiple streaming options didn’t exist.

TV Blackout Crisis: 2017 Breaks Blackout Record as Broadcasters Rake in Billions from Viewers

Since 2010, millions of Americans have seen dark screens instead of watching their favorite channels due to more than 1,000 broadcaster-initiated blackouts. In the 10-year period between 2008 and 2018, retrans fees collected by broadcasters went from about a half a billion dollars to $10.1 billion, an increase of 1,920 percent.  With 213 blackouts, 2017 was the worst year for TV blackouts on record.

  • 24 blackouts in 2019
  • 164 blackouts in 2018
  • 213 blackouts in 2017
  • 104 blackouts in 2016
  • 193 blackouts in 2015
  • 94 blackouts in 2014
  • 119 blackouts in 2013
  • 90 blackouts in 2012
  • 42 blackouts in 2011
  • 8 blackouts in 2010

The American Television Alliance (ATVA) brings together an unprecedented coalition of consumer groups, cable, satellite, telephone companies, and independent programmers to raise awareness about the risk TV viewers face as broadcasters increasingly threaten service disruptions that would deny viewers access to the programs they and their families enjoy.

For more information about ATVA, visit our website. Follow us on Twitter @ATVAlliance.

New Year Hangover: Broadcasters Blackout Millions of TV Viewers

College Bowl Games, Rose Parade Impacted

Broadcasters Pocket $10.1 Billion for ‘Free’ TV in 2018

 Washington, D.C.  According to an American Television Alliance Analysis (ATVA) of publicly available reports, consumers faced up to 70 year-end blackouts on the eve of College football bowl games, pro football playoff games, and holiday programming.  Broadcasters pulled the plug on millions of consumers across the country:

  • TEGNA blacked out over 1 million Verizon Fios customers in Washington, DC, Baltimore, MD, Norfolk, VA and Buffalo, NY.  TEGNA is proposing a substantial rate increase that could force a blackout of highly anticipated college football bowl games, including the New Year’s Day matchup between Kentucky and Penn State.  The blackout could also impact upcoming pro football playoff games.

Broadcasters shattered the record for the most TV blackouts in a single calendar year in 2017, intentionally taking down signals from cable and satellite customers a staggering 213 times last year.  Consumers have been blacked out 140 times in 2018, collecting $10.1 billion in retrans fees, up from $9.3 billion in 2017.

“Talk about a hangover, broadcasters gave America a big blackout on New Year’s Day,” said ATVA spokesman Trent Duffy.  “Millions of American TV viewers woke up this morning looking for football and local news and found a dark screen.  This situation will continue to deteriorate until Congress and the FCC take action to fix this problem for consumers.”

Retransmission consent fees (“retrans fees”) are the payments that TV distributors (cable, satellite, and other TV providers) make to broadcasters to carry their TV channels. The rules governing our video marketplace were first written in 1934 and last updated in the 1992 Cable Act. These rules were written at a time when most consumers had only one choice for pay TV service and the internet was still in its infancy.

TV Blackout Crisis: 2017 Breaks Blackout Record as Broadcasters Rake in Billions from Viewers

Since 2010, millions of Americans have seen dark screens instead of watching their favorite channels due to more than 1,000 broadcaster-initiated blackouts.  With 213 blackouts, 2017 was the worst year for TV blackouts on record.

  • 140 blackouts in 2018
  • 213 blackouts in 2017
  • 104 blackouts in 2016
  • 193 blackouts in 2015
  • 94 blackouts in 2014
  • 119 blackouts in 2013
  • 90 blackouts in 2012
  • 42 blackouts in 2011
  • 8 blackouts in 2010

The American Television Alliance (ATVA) brings together an unprecedented coalition of consumer groups, cable, satellite, telephone companies, and independent programmers to raise awareness about the risk TV viewers face as broadcasters increasingly threaten service disruptions that would deny viewers access to the programs they and their families enjoy.

For more information about ATVA, visit our website. Follow us on Twitter @ATVAlliance.

Update: Tis The Season for TV Blackouts: Consumers Brace for Year-End Blackouts of Live Sports and Holiday Programming

All-Time Blackouts Top 1,000 With No End in Sight
Broadcasters Pocket $10.1 Billion for ‘Free’ TV in 2018

Washington, D.C.  Broadcasters across the country are threatening to blackout millions of consumers on the eve of College football bowl games, pro football playoff games, and holiday programming.  Live televised football games are the most frequently targeted and blacked out programming category, according to an analysis by the American Television Alliance (ATVA).

Broadcasters are threatening to blackout millions of consumers before December 31, 2018:

  • TEGNA is threatening to blackout over 1 million Verizon Fios customers in Washington, DC, Baltimore, MD, Norfolk, VA and Buffalo, NY, according to recent public reports. TEGNA is proposing a substantial rate increase that could force a blackout of highly anticipated college football bowl games, including the New Year’s Day matchup between Kentucky and Penn State.  The potential blackout could also impact upcoming pro football playoff games.
  • TV station owner Nexstar is threatening to blackout American Cable Alliance (ACA) member TDS, a small cable provider in several small and rural markets. The Nexstar signals go dark just ahead of college bowl matchups, including Kentucky vs. Penn State.  Nexstar has many similar ongoing disputes with other small cable operators. Other broadcasters are also threatening smaller operators with retransmission consent blackouts..
  • Tribune Broadcasting is threatening six million Charter Communications’ Spectrum customers with a blackout that could prevent TV viewers from seeing live sporting events including pro football playoff games.Tribune is also threatening to pull its WGN America cable signal, which would impact 14 million consumers.

Broadcasters shattered the record for the most TV blackouts in a single calendar year in 2017, intentionally taking down signals from cable and satellite customers a staggering 213 times last year.  Consumers have been blacked out 137 times in 2018, collecting $10.1 billion in retrans fees, up from $9.3 billion in 2017.

“Tis the season for broadcaster blackouts.  Broadcasters are notorious for deliberately targeting live sports and other must-see TV at the end of the year.  Following a record year for blackouts in 2017, the blackout crisis continued to affect millions of TV viewers across the country.  This is one issue that is attracting bipartisan support and should be on the agenda for Congress next year.  The situation will continue to deteriorate for TV viewers until Congress and the FCC take action to protect consumers,” said ATVA spokesman Trent Duffy.

Retransmission consent fees (“retrans fees”) are the payments that TV distributors (cable, satellite, and other TV providers) make to broadcasters to carry their TV channels. The rules governing our video marketplace were first written in 1934 and last updated in the 1992 Cable Act. These rules were written at a time when most consumers had only one choice for pay TV service and the internet was still in its infancy.

TV Blackout Crisis: 2017 Breaks Blackout Record as Broadcasters Rake in Billions from Viewers

Since 2010, millions of Americans have seen dark screens instead of watching their favorite channels due to more than 1,000 broadcaster-initiated blackouts. With 213 blackouts, 2017 was the worst year for TV blackouts on record.

  • 137 blackouts in 2018 (And counting)
  • 213 blackouts in 2017 (A New Record)
  • 104 blackouts in 2016
  • 193 blackouts in 2015
  • 94 blackouts in 2014
  • 119 blackouts in 2013
  • 90 blackouts in 2012
  • 42 blackouts in 2011
  • 8 blackouts in 2010

The American Television Alliance (ATVA) brings together an unprecedented coalition of consumer groups, cable, satellite, telephone companies, and independent programmers to raise awareness about the risk TV viewers face as broadcasters increasingly threaten service disruptions that would deny viewers access to the programs they and their families enjoy.

For more information about ATVA, visit our website. Follow us on Twitter @ATVAlliance.

Tis The Season for TV Blackouts: Consumers Brace for Year-End Blackouts of Live Sports and Holiday Programming

All-Time Blackouts Top 1,000 With No End in Sight
Broadcasters Pocket $10.1 Billion for ‘Free’ TV in 2018

Washington, D.C.  Disney is threatening to blackout its ABC affiliates in Philadelphia and New York for Verizon Fios customers, according to recent public reports.  Disney is also demanding Verizon pay for the ACC Network in order to keep Disney and ESPN on its channel lineup.

College football bowl games, pro football playoff games, and holiday programming are a favorite target of broadcasters at the end of each year.  Live televised marquee football games are the most frequently targeted and blacked out programming category, according to an analysis by the American Television Alliance (ATVA).

Broadcasters shattered the record for the most TV blackouts in a single calendar year in 2017, intentionally taking down signals from cable and satellite customers a staggering 213 times last year.  Consumers have been blacked out 137 times in 2018, collecting $10.1 billion in retrans fees, up from $9.3 billion in 2017.

“Tis the season for broadcaster blackouts.  Broadcasters are notorious for deliberately targeting live sports and other must-see TV at the end of the year.  Following a record year for blackouts in 2017, the blackout crisis continued to affect millions of TV viewers across the country.  This is one issue that is attracting bipartisan support and should be on the agenda for Congress next year.  The situation will continue to deteriorate for TV viewers until Congress and the FCC take action to protect consumers,” said ATVA spokesman Trent Duffy.

Retransmission consent fees (“retrans fees”) are the payments that TV distributors (cable, satellite, and other TV providers) make to broadcasters to carry their TV channels. The rules governing our video marketplace were first written in 1934 and last updated in the 1992 Cable Act. These rules were written at a time when most consumers had only one choice for pay TV service and the internet was still in its infancy.

TV Blackout Crisis: 2017 Breaks Blackout Record as Broadcasters Rake in Billions from Viewers

Since 2010, millions of Americans have seen dark screens instead of watching their favorite channels due to more than 1,000 broadcaster-initiated blackouts. With 213 blackouts, 2017 was the worst year for TV blackouts on record.

  • 137 blackouts in 2018 (And counting)
  • 213 blackouts in 2017 (A New Record)
  • 104 blackouts in 2016
  • 193 blackouts in 2015
  • 94 blackouts in 2014
  • 119 blackouts in 2013
  • 90 blackouts in 2012
  • 42 blackouts in 2011
  • 8 blackouts in 2010

The American Television Alliance (ATVA) brings together an unprecedented coalition of consumer groups, cable, satellite, telephone companies, and independent programmers to raise awareness about the risk TV viewers face as broadcasters increasingly threaten service disruptions that would deny viewers access to the programs they and their families enjoy.

For more information about ATVA, visit our website. Follow us on Twitter @ATVAlliance.

TEGNA Initiates Massive TV Blackout On the Eve of College Football Conference Championships and Holiday Specials

Screens Go Dark for DISH Network Customers in 39 Markets
All-Time Blackout Tally Hits 1,000

Washington, D.C. – TEGNA, Inc. on December 1, 2018 caused a massive TV blackout on the eve of college football conference championships and holiday specials, pulling its signal from millions of DISH Network customers in 39 television markets in 34 states plus the District of Columbia.  The blackout is also dubiously historic since it is the 1,000thblackout since the crisis began years ago.  Consumers have endured 137 blackouts this year following a year that saw a record number of 213.

Although TEGNA restored its signal midday Saturday, diehard college football fans were unable to see the kickoff of the BIG12 conference championship game between No. 14 Texas and No. 5 Oklahoma on ABC.

“On behalf of consumers we are pleased to see TEGNA restore its signal, but it doesn’t change the fact that the TV blackout crisis is as bad as it’s ever been, and it will only get worse with college football and pro football playoffs on the way. It’s the old broadcaster playbook — use live sports and marquee programming to attempt to exploit customers into paying ridiculously higher fees. This is a direct hit on American wallets, their purchasing power, and the U.S. economy.  It’s way past time for Congress to modernize our country’s unfair and ancient video laws to protect consumers and empower free markets to prevail,” said Trent Duffy, ATVA spokesman.

The rules governing our video marketplace were first written in 1934 and last updated in the 1992 Cable Act. These rules were written at a time when most consumers had only one choice for pay TV service and the internet was still in its infancy.

TV Blackout Crisis: 2017 Breaks Blackout Record as Broadcasters Rake in Billions from Viewers

Since 2010, millions of Americans have seen dark screens instead of watching their favorite channels due to 1,000 broadcaster-initiated blackouts.  With 213 blackouts, 2017 was the worst year for TV blackouts on record.

  • 137 blackouts in 2018 (And Counting)
  • 213 blackouts in 2017 (A New Record)
  • 104 blackouts in 2016
  • 193 blackouts in 2015
  • 94 blackouts in 2014
  • 119 blackouts in 2013
  • 90 blackouts in 2012
  • 42 blackouts in 2011
  • 8 blackouts in 2010

The American Television Alliance (ATVA) brings together an unprecedented coalition of consumer groups, cable, satellite, telephone companies, and independent programmers to raise awareness about the risk TV viewers face as broadcasters increasingly threaten service disruptions that would deny viewers access to the programs they and their families enjoy.

For more information about ATVA, visit our website. Follow us on Twitter @ATVAlliance.

ATVA Applauds House Panel’s Examination of Media Marketplace

WASHINGTON, DC– The American Television Alliance (ATVA) today applauded the House Energy and Commerce Committee’s hearing to review the media marketplace. ATVA spokesman Trent Duffy released the following statement ahead of the Communications and Technology Subcommittee hearing examining the “State of the Media Marketplace.”

“ATVA thanks Chairman Blackburn and Ranking Member Doyle for holding this important hearing to examine the state of the media marketplace.  Video content is the heart of the media marketplace and it is a market that needs to be examined.

“We are grateful to Majority Whip Steve Scalise for his leadership to restart this conversation on reforming the antiquated laws that govern the video marketplace with his introduction of the “Next Generation Television Marketplace Act” of 2018.

“We live in an instant, on-demand digital world.  Consumers have unparalleled choice and competition for video content. Yet the laws that govern the video marketplace were first written in 1934 and last updated in 1992 – long before cell phones, HDTV or the Internet was even contemplated.  It is long past time for Congress to take a serious look at modernizing laws and promoting choice and competition in the media marketplace.

“We expect this hearing to advance the debate, and we look forward to engaging with Members of the Subcommittee on both sides of the aisle with fresh and creative ideas to benefit consumers and competition.”

 

###

 

The American Television Alliance (ATVA) brings together an unprecedented coalition of consumer groups, cable, satellite, telephone companies, and independent programmers to raise awareness about the risk TV viewers face as broadcasters increasingly threaten service disruptions that would deny viewers access to the programs they and their families enjoy.

For more information about ATVA, visit our website. Follow us on Twitter @ATVAlliance.

New ATVA Website Shows Runaway Blackout Crisis

Site Encourages TV Fans and Blackout Victims to Urge Congress and the FCC To Overhaul Video Regulations

Washington, D.C. – One year after a record blackout crisis in the U.S., the American Television Alliance (ATVA) today launched a new website as part of its campaign to educate TV fans, blackout victims, consumers and policymakers about the ongoing blackout crisis and the billions of dollars in exorbitant retrans fees that broadcasters collect from pay-TV subscribers each year.  Retrans fees are the fastest rising part of a monthly cable or satellite subscribers bill.

Among the new features on the website is an animated GIF showing the explosion of yearly television blackouts caused by broadcasters over the past eight years. The GIF illustrates that almost every single American community has been intentionally blacked out by a broadcaster.  The site also includes more interactive graphics and integrated advocacy functions allowing constituents to communicate with Congressional Representatives and federal regulators as well as learn about the broken retrans regime.

The unveiling of the ATVA’s new website comes after broadcasters shattered the record for the most TV blackouts in a single calendar year in 2017 (213), and have already subjected consumers to 96 blackouts in 2018.

“Since ATVA first began tracking blackouts, the TV blackout crisis has gotten much worse,” said Trent Duffy, ATVA spokesman.  “Consumers have lost billions of dollars and have been used as pawns.  Our new website will be a valuable resource for consumers and policymakers in the fight to end the blackout crisis, but ultimately it is up to Congress and the FCC to take action to protect consumers from broadcaster abuse and fix this broken system.”

The “In Your Area” section of the new site makes it easy for consumers to keep track of television blackouts in their community, both past and present, and the “News Center” keeps consumers’ finger on the pulse of the fight against the broken retrans system. Finally, the “Act Now” page allows the public to contact their Members of Congress, and connect on social media platforms.

Broadcasters pocketed $9.3 billion in 2017 from pay-TV customers for ‘free’ TV, according to industry analyst SNL Kagan.  Network takedowns have surged in the last decade as broadcasters have used blackouts of marquee programming as “deal leverage” to extract higher and higher fees from consumers.

TV Blackout Crisis: 2017 Breaks Blackout Record as Broadcasters Rake in Billions from Viewers

Since 2010, millions of Americans have seen dark screens instead of watching their favorite channels due to more than 900 broadcaster-initiated blackouts. With 213 blackouts, 2017 was the worst year for TV blackouts on record.

  • 96 blackouts in 2018 (And Counting)
  • 213 blackouts in 2017 (A New Record)
  • 104 blackouts in 2016
  • 193 blackouts in 2015
  • 94 blackouts in 2014
  • 119 blackouts in 2013
  • 90 blackouts in 2012
  • 42 blackouts in 2011
  • 8 blackouts in 2010

###

The American Television Alliance (ATVA) brings together an unprecedented coalition of consumer groups, cable, satellite, telephone companies, and independent programmers to raise awareness about the risk TV viewers face as broadcasters increasingly threaten service disruptions that would deny viewers access to the programs they and their families enjoy.

For more information about ATVA, visit our website. Follow us on Twitter @ATVAlliance.